Webinar

TO WATCH: ISO 45001 webinar recording

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If you missed it, watch it below

 

ISO 45001 will be the international standard for occupational safety and health management systems. It is designed to succeed BS OHSAS 18001 and is expected to be launched before the end of the year.

IOSH Magazine's second webinar discusses the differences between BS OHSAS 18001 and the new standard with Richard Jones, IOSH's head of policy and public affairs, David Smith, director of IMS Risk Solutions and chair of the BSI Management Systems Expert Group, and Alex Wood, health and safety manager at Morgan Sindall Fit Out.

*This webinar was organised and hosted by LexisNexis, publishers of IOSH Magazine. If you have trouble viewing the recording, please contact our technical support support@thestreamingcompany.com.

Duration: approx 1 hour, 19 minutes. This is a discussion and does not contain slides

 

 

About the speakers:

 

Richard Jones, MSc CFIOSH EurOSHM FRSH MIoD MCIPR PIEMA, Head of Policy and Public Affairs, IOSH

Richard leads on developing the Institution’s policies and public affairs strategy, including parliamentary activities and support of campaigns and media. He manages the Institution’s external liaison, consultation, representation and relationship-building. Representing IOSH on external strategic committees, he is a member of ISO PC 283 work group, developing ISO 45001.

A Chartered Safety and Health Practitioner, Fellow of IOSH and a CIPR Accredited Practitioner, Richard has an MSc in risk management and safety technology. With an engineering background, he has been a health and safety professional for 27 years and his management experience includes 16 years at a strategic level.

 

David Smith, Director IMS Risk Solutions, Chair, BSI Management Systems Expert Group

David worked in a technical support role for British Rail for over 30 years. He now works globally as a consultant providing training, assessment services and consultancy in risk management.

He has been involved in writing management standards for BSI, CEN and ISO in the field of governance, risk, resilience, integration, environmental and OHS and advised HSE on HSG 65 (refreshed) and chaired the BSI Committee on OHS management systems until appointed Chair of ISO PC 283 (ISO 45001).

He has authored and co-authored books including books on OHS, environment, food safety, integrated management, governance and risk management.

 

Alex Wood, Health and Safety Manager, Morgan Sindall Fit Out

Alex joined the fit out part of the Morgan Sindall Group in January 2016, previously working as business systems manager for the Lovell Partnership Housing division of the group in London for 15 years, with a construction background of over 30 years’ experience.

Alex managed, implemented and reviewed the Partnership Housing 9001, 14001 and 18001 management systems and will be managing the fit out division’s transition to adopt the new 45001 standard as soon as possible in a similar style to the way they were early adopters of the 2015 Quality and Environmental Standards.

He is former chairman of the Construction Health & Safety Group, an IOSH London Metropolitan branch committee member for 17 years and vice chair of the north and west London Working Well Together group.

 

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Comments

Interesting and thought provoking.

I found a lot of the information good and progression from some of the older standards, however I have come across a management system within a company that alienates the workforce and causes the workforce not to report accidents or near misses.

Whatever standard you employ, it still comes down to Communication, Co-operation, Competence & Control measures, inclusive of across the workplace involvement. Passing the H&S buck, is no excuse for poor Management involvement & lack of worker training (all workers).

Having read the draft ISO45001 document, I see little that this standards offers that has not been achieved with OHSAS 18001... which is well understood, has been adopted world wide and been very successful in achieving the goals of OSH and meeting the needs of Businesses, including presenting opportunities for improvement.
It appears to a lot of people within Business that the ever rolling production of OSH standards such as ISO 45001 is simply a money spinning exercise...purchasing standards, training of staff, auditors, adoption, accrediation, further audits, business time and costs involved etc... for no new real better benefit, except complying with a yet another new standard... We all know the strains being placed on Business finace and resources, and yet here we go again...another objective tightrope of compliance and costs, which no doubt will be placed in the path of businesses when it comes to meeting the tidal bore of pre-qualification requirements... It ponders one to ask what exactly is to be gained from this standard, as frankly I for one cannot in reality see what this standard really offers that OHSAS 18001 does not...!!

All very heady in ideal, but in reality, with the myriad of competing demands for limited resources, will the average business be able to deal with the added complexities this standard imposes and really gain the benefits mentioned in this discussion? - much less comply in the fullest sense with the standards requirements?

Our insurers look at our claims history and whether we have sprinklers fitted far more than what management systems we have in place....

I can understand the logic of integrating 45001 with 9001 and 14001:2015 to form a fully integrated system and as the webinar stated, if you already have 9001 or 14001:2015 the migration from 18001 will be easier, but I feel that any H&S Management system should focus primarily on achieving a safer workplace. The emphasis in 1400:2015 and 45001 on the context of the organisation detract from what we are ultimately trying to achieve. The context of the organisation I have drafted for 9 and 14 runs to so many pages, I question its effectiveness for people to fully understand it. I should be focusing on a safer workplace by adopting processes and procedures that keep not just the workforce, including Contractors, but also neighbours and the local community safe, not worrying about the external and internal factors that will detract from me delivering 45001, because to be honest, the 160 plus issues will not really affect it substantially. (or 9001 and 14001:2015 for that matter)

Stuart has covered it all. No more to be said.

I completely agree with Stuart

Stuart. has hit the nail right on the head......... I believe that there is little to be gained by introducing a 'new' standard when the 'old' is perfectly adequate. This is change for changes sake - perhaps applying the test of reasonableness here would be a better way of looking at it ...... are the advantages of 45001 worth the resources required for the change? I don't see it myself.
I think that organisations that have 18001 would be as well to continue with dirt, whereas organisations seeking new certification would look to out 45001. That will be the recommendation my Board of Directors.

Stuart. has hit the nail right on the head......... I believe that there is little to be gained by introducing a 'new' standard when the 'old' is perfectly adequate. This is change for changes sake - perhaps applying the test of reasonableness here would be a better way of looking at it ...... are the advantages of 45001 worth the resources required for the change? I don't see it myself.
I think that organisations that have 18001 would be as well to continue with dirt, whereas organisations seeking new certification would look to out 45001. That will be the recommendation my Board of Directors.

Another standard for another standard and so on. Can I ask will this stop people being killed or injured in the workplace? No I doubt it. We must as practitioners develop cultures not paperwork with meaningless words. Another standard for the doubters to say "Elf and Safety" gone mad!!!

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